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It’s here MITNG’S Halloween Podcast 2013

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This is a compilation of spooky songs and movie trailers, old and new. The idea was not to spoon feed you the obviously scary, but to get a little psychological with it as well. You may wonder, while listening, why some of the songs are on this podcast and if you have to wonder you’re probably too left brain to get it. But most of you will identify with the tracks I’ve chosen and I’m sure if I was there with you, you’d give me a high five, but I’m not so a virtual five will have to do. Below is the list of tunes on this podcast. I know the quality isn’t the best, but if you could please share this, I’d be most gracious!

The tracks in this episode are as follows:

1. Sliver Shamrock theme from John Carpenters Halloween III : Season of the Witch (1982)

2. Main title song from Dario Argento’s Suspiria performed by GOBLIN (1977)

3. Main title song from the Twilight Zone television series (1985-1989)

4. “Sentionauts” from the Beyond The Black Rainbow OST performed by Black Mountain (2010)

5. Trailer for Astro Zombies (1968) directed by Ted V. Mikels

6. Sea Within A Sea by The Horrors off thier Primary Colors album

7. Main title song for The Amityville Horror (1979)

8. The Space Between by How To Destroy Angels off their self titled album

9. Main title song from The Shining performed by Wendy Carlos (1980)

10. Road to Hell by Sleigh Bells off Reign of Terror

11. Trailer for I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957) directed by Gene Fowler Jr.

12. Main title song from Clive Barker’s NIGHTBREED performed by Danny Elfman (1990)

13. Hybrid Moments by The Misfits off their album Static Age (1997)

14. Main title song from the television show The Walking Dead performed by Bear McCreary

15. Trailer from The Horror of Dracula (1958) directed by Terrence Fisher

16. Frost by SALEM off thier album King Night (2010)

17. Main title theme from Cannibal Holocaust (1980) directed by Ruggero Deodato performed by Riz Ortolani

18. Main title theme from PHANTASM (1979) directed by Don Coscarelli and performed by Fred Myrow and Malcolm Seagrave

19. Main title theme from 28 Days Later (2003) directed by Danny Boyle and performed by John Murphy

20. What’s He Building by Tom Waites off Mule Variations

21. What’s A Girl To Do-Bat For Lashes off the Fur and Gold album (2006)

22. Main tile from The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) Directed by Robert Wise

23. Ghost Town- The Specials (1981)

24. Last Caress- The Misfits off the EP Beware (1980) and on Static Age (1997)

25. Main title song from Pans Labryinth (2006) composed by Javier Navarette

26. Main title song from The Omen (1976)  Ave Satani performed by Tenerife Film Orchestra & Choir

27.  Perfect Day- Lou Reed (1972) album Walk on the Wildside

28. Promo spot for The Haunted Strangler featuring Boris Karloff (1957) directed by Robert day

29. Music from The Haunted Mansion at Disney “Grim Grinning Ghost”
composed by Buddy Baker, with lyrics written by X Atencio

30. Main title song from True Blood “Bad Things” performed and written by Jace Everett

MITNG ON PODOMATIC

 

The Omen – Instilling Fear of Children Since 1976

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“When the Jews return to Zion / And a comet rips the sky / And the Holy Roman Empire rises, / Then You and I must die. / From the eternal sea he rises, / Creating armies on either shore, / Turning man against his brother / ‘Til man exists no more.”

Originally advanced screened in the United States on June 6, 1976, Richard Donner‘s The Omen, starring Gregory Peck and Lee Remick, terrified audiences with it’s hauntingly evil portrayal of the devil incarnate, in the shape of a little boy.

When their child dies at birth, Robert Thorn (Peck) decides to deceive his wife to spare her the grief.  In their child’s place, he agrees to take into their care, another child, born the same night as his biological child died.  Unbeknownst to him, or to his wife, Kathy, the child is the seed of Satan.  As Damien, their “adopted” child begins to grow, it sets in motion a chain of unfortunate, and deadly, events from which neither Robert nor his wife, Kathy, can escape.

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Many people have heard the stories of The Omen curse – the lightning strikes, the plane crashes, animal attacks, car accidents and the like.  Whether or not you believe in it, the murmurs of such a curse lurking around the production of The Omen did do something successfully, it drove people to the film either out of curiosity or morbid fascination.  Personally, I agree with the folks at deathensemble.com – and since I don’t believe in Satan, how could I possibly believe Satan didn’t want The Omen being made so he cursed the production of and those involved with the film?

Yeah, about that…

You see, the not believing in Satan, or in the Roman Catholic church, poses a significant problem for members of the viewing audience.  But, I suppose there’s two ways of looking at it – a.) who cares if these people don’t buy it, they knew what they were going to see, b.) maybe they’ll leave being a little more afraid of deception, children, and large, black dogs.

Either way, The Omen comes out a win-win for a filmgoer.  After all, devil or no, is there anything more terrifying than a child who doesn’t seem to think twice before harming its own mother?

There are plenty of tense moments, great effects, and the plot is kept moving by well-paced storytelling.

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The Omen made a strong impression on me when I first saw it years ago as a much younger incarnation of myself, one who still believed in demons and ghosts and biblical evil in general.  Now that I’m older, The Omen evokes other, more tangible fears about the cost of deception in a relationship, the alien nature of quietly scheming children, and of religiously motivated violence.

In a way, these two visions I have of The Omen make the film, its construction and execution, a very good one, even after more than 35 years.

 

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