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BOOM! STUDIOS unveils first 6 pages of the new Big Trouble in Little China comic book

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And I just watch this film for the 100th time only two days ago. For those that don’t know Big Trouble….it is an eighties cult classic, that has been gaining steam ever since it’s lack-lustre performance at the box office, back in 1986. Directed by John Carpenter (Halloween, The Thing) this Kung Fu fantasy paid homage to the seventies kung fu flicks that inundated smaller screens throughout America. Not unlike films such as Buckaroo Banzai, it was perhaps one of the most underrated films of that decade and understandably so, given the number of films it was up against such as Platoon, Top Gun, Ferris Buellar’s Day Off and Aliens, films that I think we can all agree were classics across the board.

But flash forward 30 years later and Big Trouble… is now looked at as a true cult classic and lucky for us the comic book world is about to get another dose of Jack Burton, right where the film ended.

(Via. EW)

Beginning with the first issue on June 4, Boom! Studios will be rolling out Big Trouble in Little China, the new comic book series co-written by Eric Powell (creator of the awesome series The Goon) and Carpenter, with art care of Brian Churilla (creator of the critically acclaimed The Secret History of D.B. Cooper). In the comic, Burton — still played by the likeness of the mullet-clad Russell — finds a series of new adventures aboard the Pork Chop Express, the big rig he kept trying to recover in the film.

This is amazing news for fans of the film, and who knows, maybe if it does well, there could be a future for it on the big screen again. Below are more excerpts from the conversation with Carpenter and Powell regarding the collaboration on this series.

Though they hadn’t met before, Carpenter and Powell found kindred spirits in one another. “I had a definite idea of what I wanted to do with it,” says Powell. “The minute we sat down and started talking, what he thought we should do was exactly what I had in mind. We were on the same page from the beginning.” Carpenter describes their working relationship thusly: “Eric works really hard, sends his stuff to me, and I say, ‘Good job!’” the director says. “It’s a great process. It’s one I can actually do.”

The first issue of the ongoing monthly comic book series Big Trouble In Little China hits stores on June 4 with five different collectible covers drawn by Powell, Joe Quinones, Chris Weston, Terry Dodson, and Emi Yonemura Brown. But just to whet your whistle, you can take the first exclusive look at the first six pages below (click each page to enlarge for easier reading).

It’s here MITNG’S Halloween Podcast 2013

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This is a compilation of spooky songs and movie trailers, old and new. The idea was not to spoon feed you the obviously scary, but to get a little psychological with it as well. You may wonder, while listening, why some of the songs are on this podcast and if you have to wonder you’re probably too left brain to get it. But most of you will identify with the tracks I’ve chosen and I’m sure if I was there with you, you’d give me a high five, but I’m not so a virtual five will have to do. Below is the list of tunes on this podcast. I know the quality isn’t the best, but if you could please share this, I’d be most gracious!

The tracks in this episode are as follows:

1. Sliver Shamrock theme from John Carpenters Halloween III : Season of the Witch (1982)

2. Main title song from Dario Argento’s Suspiria performed by GOBLIN (1977)

3. Main title song from the Twilight Zone television series (1985-1989)

4. “Sentionauts” from the Beyond The Black Rainbow OST performed by Black Mountain (2010)

5. Trailer for Astro Zombies (1968) directed by Ted V. Mikels

6. Sea Within A Sea by The Horrors off thier Primary Colors album

7. Main title song for The Amityville Horror (1979)

8. The Space Between by How To Destroy Angels off their self titled album

9. Main title song from The Shining performed by Wendy Carlos (1980)

10. Road to Hell by Sleigh Bells off Reign of Terror

11. Trailer for I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957) directed by Gene Fowler Jr.

12. Main title song from Clive Barker’s NIGHTBREED performed by Danny Elfman (1990)

13. Hybrid Moments by The Misfits off their album Static Age (1997)

14. Main title song from the television show The Walking Dead performed by Bear McCreary

15. Trailer from The Horror of Dracula (1958) directed by Terrence Fisher

16. Frost by SALEM off thier album King Night (2010)

17. Main title theme from Cannibal Holocaust (1980) directed by Ruggero Deodato performed by Riz Ortolani

18. Main title theme from PHANTASM (1979) directed by Don Coscarelli and performed by Fred Myrow and Malcolm Seagrave

19. Main title theme from 28 Days Later (2003) directed by Danny Boyle and performed by John Murphy

20. What’s He Building by Tom Waites off Mule Variations

21. What’s A Girl To Do-Bat For Lashes off the Fur and Gold album (2006)

22. Main tile from The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) Directed by Robert Wise

23. Ghost Town- The Specials (1981)

24. Last Caress- The Misfits off the EP Beware (1980) and on Static Age (1997)

25. Main title song from Pans Labryinth (2006) composed by Javier Navarette

26. Main title song from The Omen (1976)  Ave Satani performed by Tenerife Film Orchestra & Choir

27.  Perfect Day- Lou Reed (1972) album Walk on the Wildside

28. Promo spot for The Haunted Strangler featuring Boris Karloff (1957) directed by Robert day

29. Music from The Haunted Mansion at Disney “Grim Grinning Ghost”
composed by Buddy Baker, with lyrics written by X Atencio

30. Main title song from True Blood “Bad Things” performed and written by Jace Everett

MITNG ON PODOMATIC

 

Beyond The Black Rainbow is true 80′s horror

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Originally I had intended to watch this movie at a local art house theater, but I saw that it was available on Amazon on Demand, so I decided to enjoy the movie in bed with my wife, dog and laptop. What you notice immediately about Beyond The Black Rainbow is that it draws heavily upon the 80′s science fiction horror aesthetic. It’s easy to see why it has been compared to such films as THX 1138, A Clockwork Orange, The Hunger and pretty much all the works of David Cronenberg, but not to be caught up in the smoke and mirrors there still has to be a good story…right? Searching for a viable plot in such artistry can sometimes be a daunting task, but you soon realize that the formula is the same, but it’s just being presented like a sarcophagus at a museum or vestige of some by-gone era that the director Panos Cosmatos (son of George P. Cosmatos, who directed Tombstone, Cobra, and Rambo: First Blood Part II) has meticulously decided to pay homage to. BTBR speaks in metaphors, the viewer is meant to take something from every single frame, the director even goes as far as beginning these super short scenes with fade in and outs of the grittiest red instead of the usual black.

Right now’s when you’d probably like for me to explain what the fuck this film’s about…

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Deep within the mysterious Arboria Institute, a beautiful girl (Eva Allan) is held captive by a scientist, Dr. Barry Nyle (Michael Rogers). Her mind is controlled by a sinister technology (a mysterious pyramid-shaped light). Speechlessly, she waits for her next session with the deranged Dr. Nyle. She escapes her cell under the watchful eye of Dr. Nyle peering through video monitors. She journeys through the darkest reaches of the Institute but Nyle wonʼt easily part with his most gifted and dangerous creation.

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It all makes for some amazing vintage horror done with a committed cast and one hell of an art director Antonio Colin and costume designer Kathi Moore. Shot entirely in Vancouver, the story travels along an analog path of science verging on insanity. As we learn more about the Arboria Institute we find out about or at least we think we find out about what the institutes real mission is and that’s when BTBR begins tinkering with the idea of the occult and going places with the storyline that all good 80′s horrors can’t do without. Like Alejandro Jodorowsky’s psychedelic masterpiece Holy Mountain, BTBR toys, ever so slightly, with god/devil themes in the form of glowing masonic style triangles and the Sentionauts (ominous albino baby faced worker bees or minions for the Arboria Institute) but doesn’t try to be what it’s not thus elevating the films level of genius by acknowledging the Satanic prime directive and moving on. It has to be said before I continue that the soundtrack is near flawless. Panos obviously knew that if the image was the vehicle the music had to be the engine so he did what any film/indie video director does and enlist the help of none other than Jeremy Schimdt from the synth rock band Black Mountain to pepper this art piece in a blanket of moogness, add that sound to the brilliant cinematography of Norm Li and you have a film fit for any classic VHS library.

The following Interview with Panos Cosmatos in it’s entirety is available @ Dork Shelf

DS: How involved were you with the score because it felt so integral to the mood and tone? I’d imagine it was something you wanted to be heavily involved in.

PC: Well, Jeremy Schmidt from Black Mountain wrote the score and has an amazing record collection of soundtracks Panos Cosmatosand synth music from the 70s and 80s. He’s very influenced by that time and writes this amazing music that he records on analogue synthesizers. Once I discovered him, I really wanted him to score it. I showed him a rough cut and he really wanted to do it. I think he drew influences from a lot of not just soundtracks, but different artists from that era. John Carpenter was definitely part of that, but there were so many. I don’t know, our musical sensibilities were so close that I gave him some guidance, but generally I just let him create and it was like Christmas. Because I’m a fan of his, it was amazing to just to get to hear him create music and put it on my movie.

Overall the film’s formula isn’t anything something we’ve never seen before, but what Panos has done was added more to an era of films that had no idea what is was then or what it would become.

DS: How difficult was it to find financing for a project as experimental and out there as this? I’d imagine there would have been a lot of scratched heads while you were pitching it around.

PC: Well, I self financed it, but that didn’t stop people from scratching their heads when I was trying to talk them into working on it (laughs). The people that responded to it responded to it very strongly and wanted to be involved. It was just hard to find those people at times. The only reference they had for my work was a music video that was online. So that would show them that perhaps that mentality combined the script could be something interesting.

BTBR is what was to be expected of the son of the director of COBRA and seeing the world through his goggles and knowing the urge to go totally modern and sell this to the studios and not doing it, is a feat within itself and should be celebrated in this age of overdone. I bet no one could have seen this rebirth of 80′s coming and most won’t understand it or they think they will, but due to their lack of love for films, won’t be able to place a proper finger on it and that’s what I believe directors like Panos Cosmatos and Ti West (House Of The Devil) has set out to create…enigmas. Films without a home, but stand alone as works of art never to be looked upon as a movies in the Hollywood sense. BTBR is pure aural and eye candy for lovers of great science fiction (notice how I didn’t write 80′s science fiction). You won’t find me trying to even coddle those less likely to watch this movie cause there’s a time and place for everything and unlike some films from the past this one harnesses it’s own power, and because of modern technology, will be less susceptible to degradation/wear and tear unlike it’s 80′s predecessors, and that’s a bit of next gen that I’m sure even Panos Cosmatos is happy with.

MITNG Celebrates Halloween with 31 Frightful Flicks

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Halloween holds a special place in our hearts here at MITNG.  There is no better time or place to celebrate horror, the macabre, the strange, and the supernatural.

Throughout October, we’ll recommend a different horror flick each day for your viewing enjoyment.  From around the world and many different genres, we hope you’ll discover new gems and remember some old favorites.

Some notable films (like John Carpenter’s Halloween) have been omitted in order to suggest some (potentially) lesser known movies.  We know there are thousands of deserving films out there - we love that! – but there are only 31 days in October, so we’ve exercised some creative restraint.  We encourage you to let us know what your favorites are so we can cover them in the future.  We’ve also provided a few links below if you want to know more about the history and celebration of Halloween.

With that in mind, MITNG is pleased to present 31 days of horror to help you get in the mood for Halloween.  We hope you enjoy.

WARNING: THIS VIDEO IS DEFINITELY NOT SAFE FOR WORK

Want to know what Halloween is about?

Halloween History

ABOUT Halloween

What the Scholars Say

What Neo-Pagans Think of Halloween

Christians and Halloween

M.I.T.N.G reviews Panos Cosmatos’s Reagan era inspired science fiction horror Beyond The Black Rainbow

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