Category Archives: Music

Darkside – Psychic review

When a musician decides to form a group or duo after an exciting career, or even start a side project, it’s practically impossible to not compare it to the works they’ve done. We all thought of it when you read this. Whether it’s Dave Grohl in Foo Fighters, or Thom Yorke in Atoms for Peace, the original work lingers with the artist. Nicolas Jaar was somebody I didn’t believe would survive in the destructive business of music. After a solid 2011 release with Space Is Only Noise, I did not believe it could be replicated, nor should be as it would feel too forced. Oddly enough, during this time frame Jaar was working on another project with fellow touring guitarist, Dave Herrington, and they formed the duo Darkside. Combining the electronic tension of Jaar’s studio work with the organic sounds found in the live performances, they eased their way through recording the finally released Psychic album.

I usually stay away from reading reviews until I have my own opinion, but I stumbled across a mixture of positive and negative. I feel as though this album has been misjudged by both sides. One critic said it resembled the unasked question of, “What does Nicolas Jaar and Eric Clapton sound like together?” To me, that’s a dumb comment. I can see the resemblance, but I would honestly be intrigued into what the combo would sound like. Psychic does branch off from the usual spectrum Jaar likes to take, but the eerie and tense atmosphere sticks with the listener. The monster opener, “Golden Arrow”, clocks in at just under 12 minutes. There’s more excitement in these 12 minutes than the 46 in Space Is Only Noise. While comparable, Psychic could appeal to a different audience that wasn’t content with the prior release by Jaar.

These eight tracks have their distinct moments that clearly separate one from another. The minute and a half lingerer “Sitra” is completely different from the following track, “Heart”. They fit together like a puzzle piece, but the following song reminds me of an abstract brit-pop tune. The addition to Herrington’s guitar allows for these odd, but compelling moments to flow smoothly. At the core, these are electronic dance tracks, but from the listeners perspective, they come across as very experimental at times. The structure to them, although quite simple, is hidden by Jaar’s need to keep the beat slower. Some songs, like the closer “Metatron”, fall into ambient territory. That’s the beauty of Jaar’s experimental side. He’s able to flip the listeners perspective of genres and how they fit together.

Going back to the Clapton comment, I hear it the more I listen, but still I wouldn’t consider it bad. Psychic does embrace Herrington’s bluesy guitar licks, but they don’t create a blues feel. I have more of a Jon Hopkin’s Immunity sound in mind. That’s probably due to the fact that both albums are released in 2013 and they have eight tracks. Besides that, there’s really nothing in common. What Psychic does carry that surprised me is Tom Wait vocals that aren’t sung by the man himself. At first, it was hard to swallow these raspy vocals, but the more I listen, the more I understand how it pieces together with the ‘blues’ combination.

What captures my attention with each listen is the other strange additions that Jaar included. I feel like there are many different versions of songs that were made over the two years it took to record. Should there be more guitar? Is the beat hidden enough? Do these vocals sound like noise enough? I bet none of these questions were asked, but I began to think about how these two completely different musicians came to a solid conclusion about their contributions to Psychic. Up front, it sounds like a Nicolas Jaar album. Behind the scenes it feels like Dave Herrington may have had more of an influence. There’s multiple ways to look at this album, whether you hear the blues or the electronics, they oddly fit together nicely to create an album that will be more enjoyable as time went on. Even I was hesitant with my first listen.

8.3/10

Listen to a new Arcade Fire song “Afterlife”

MITNG has been covering the recent news for Reflektor very heavily, and it’s come to the surface that a studio release for a song titled “Afterlife” has arrived. On Zane Lowe’s BBC radio show, he premiered the track, which resembles the early 80′s dance floor scene, especially in England. It still has that classic Arcade Fire twist to it, but it’s nice to see the band try new sounds. I’m really excited to see what happens with the rest of Reflektor, which is released October 29th.

Listen to “Afterlife” below:

It’s here MITNG’S Halloween Podcast 2013

Halloween1

This is a compilation of spooky songs and movie trailers, old and new. The idea was not to spoon feed you the obviously scary, but to get a little psychological with it as well. You may wonder, while listening, why some of the songs are on this podcast and if you have to wonder you’re probably too left brain to get it. But most of you will identify with the tracks I’ve chosen and I’m sure if I was there with you, you’d give me a high five, but I’m not so a virtual five will have to do. Below is the list of tunes on this podcast. I know the quality isn’t the best, but if you could please share this, I’d be most gracious!

The tracks in this episode are as follows:

1. Sliver Shamrock theme from John Carpenters Halloween III : Season of the Witch (1982)

2. Main title song from Dario Argento’s Suspiria performed by GOBLIN (1977)

3. Main title song from the Twilight Zone television series (1985-1989)

4. “Sentionauts” from the Beyond The Black Rainbow OST performed by Black Mountain (2010)

5. Trailer for Astro Zombies (1968) directed by Ted V. Mikels

6. Sea Within A Sea by The Horrors off thier Primary Colors album

7. Main title song for The Amityville Horror (1979)

8. The Space Between by How To Destroy Angels off their self titled album

9. Main title song from The Shining performed by Wendy Carlos (1980)

10. Road to Hell by Sleigh Bells off Reign of Terror

11. Trailer for I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957) directed by Gene Fowler Jr.

12. Main title song from Clive Barker’s NIGHTBREED performed by Danny Elfman (1990)

13. Hybrid Moments by The Misfits off their album Static Age (1997)

14. Main title song from the television show The Walking Dead performed by Bear McCreary

15. Trailer from The Horror of Dracula (1958) directed by Terrence Fisher

16. Frost by SALEM off thier album King Night (2010)

17. Main title theme from Cannibal Holocaust (1980) directed by Ruggero Deodato performed by Riz Ortolani

18. Main title theme from PHANTASM (1979) directed by Don Coscarelli and performed by Fred Myrow and Malcolm Seagrave

19. Main title theme from 28 Days Later (2003) directed by Danny Boyle and performed by John Murphy

20. What’s He Building by Tom Waites off Mule Variations

21. What’s A Girl To Do-Bat For Lashes off the Fur and Gold album (2006)

22. Main tile from The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) Directed by Robert Wise

23. Ghost Town- The Specials (1981)

24. Last Caress- The Misfits off the EP Beware (1980) and on Static Age (1997)

25. Main title song from Pans Labryinth (2006) composed by Javier Navarette

26. Main title song from The Omen (1976)  Ave Satani performed by Tenerife Film Orchestra & Choir

27.  Perfect Day- Lou Reed (1972) album Walk on the Wildside

28. Promo spot for The Haunted Strangler featuring Boris Karloff (1957) directed by Robert day

29. Music from The Haunted Mansion at Disney “Grim Grinning Ghost”
composed by Buddy Baker, with lyrics written by X Atencio

30. Main title song from True Blood “Bad Things” performed and written by Jace Everett

MITNG ON PODOMATIC

 

Arcade Fire release yet another trailer

As the date draws nearer to the ultimate release for Reflektor, Arcade Fire seamlessly excite fans again with another trailer. Since appearing at performances like the YouTube’s Music Awards, and the Bridge School Benefit Show, they’ll perform on “The Colbert Report” October 21st. Expect (or hope) to hear some new tracks. The band continues to hold us on a string.

Nonethless, view the cryptic and beautiful trailer below:

 

Dez Harley is a Nostalgic Guru

How much music is released on a daily basis? Let me rephrase that question; how much music do we miss out on a daily basis? Take a look at any Soundcloud, Bandcamp, or Facebook music page and that will put into perspective about the amount of potentially great tunes we forfeit by staying safe with our collection. I received a link recently with a caption titled, “Prod. by MF Doom”. It doesn’t matter what else was written, because I either thought this was a joke, or a surprise, but I assumed the first option. Readying my ears for embarrassment, I opened the link to a well made Bandcamp page that brightened my assumption of this ‘MF Doom’ track.

Attached was colorful images of bikini clad women and.. a cassette recorder? It was like I found deep web 10 years ago. My first thought before pressing play was another vaporwave track that’s covered by a solid layout, but I listened further and was pleased with the opening beat. Reminiscing an old feature flash game combined with DJ Shadow in his prime, “Foreshadow” was relatively fresh. I still didn’t know what to expect with the track, but I figured out the MF Doom label as soon as the instrumental broke into a replica beat. I assume the rapper is Dez Harley, who comes in pretty heavily once the new beat takes shape. I was sort of confused with the mixture of genres, but it began to make sense as the songs progressed. Dez Harley has a unique flow to him. He’s not out there like Danny Brown, but the guy has lungs of steel. I didn’t bother researching more about the artist, because the mysteriousness only added to my experience with this track. Apologies go out if I miss the mark completely.

He takes an enormous chunk of the song laying lyrics after lyrics praising his success and hard-work. It’s convincing enough to keep me captivated. After Harley takes a breath, the instrumental flows back into a vaporwave section filled with blips and bloops that just scream Twin Peaks and NWA. It’s nostalgia to my ears. At just over 3 minutes, Dez Harley takes a stab at the massively full hip-hop pool with a unique sound that stood out among the list of forgotten rappers. I would classify his style into a slacker-rap (Ironically his flow is extremely talented) with a heavy vaporwave influence. On the outside, this combination is doomed, but thanks to chances taken by people like Dez, I can recieve exciting new tracks like “Foreshadow”.

 

 

Danny Brown – Old

From the beginning of “Side A”, it’s obvious that Danny Brown has changed. Since his 2011 release, XXX, Danny has reached some major ups and downs. His unique character of being Detroit’s King Pin in rap has been hidden by the fact that he isn’t a usual player in the modern rap game. Compared to fellow Detroit-ee, Big Sean, Danny resembles someone who has just escaped a psych ward. His gap-toothed, psychotic smile was a clear influence for the infamous Miley Cyrus tongue flair that she seems to flaunt at every opportunity. From an outsiders view, Danny Brown is the devil of hip-hop today.

Old doesn’t play out like XXX. From the beginning, Danny raps about how people keep asking to change back to his older style, but in reality, Danny isn’t interested in it. He wants to keep the ball rolling and stay on top of his game. The idea does make sense; why play safe in a genre where playing safe creates losers. Danny isn’t about staying within the realms of his peers. He’s outlandish, crude, original, and honest, but his approach to compacting all these different ideas strays from traditional values in rap. While XXX presented a wild and dirty side to Danny, he’s taken more of an aggressive and louder approach on Old.

He’s lucky enough to have the likes of Freddie Gibbs, Schoolboy Q, Charli XCX, A$AP Rocky, and surprisingly Purity Ring make appearances on this album. The Purity Ring feature was the most shocking, considering that they pretty much take over the track and make it a Danny Brown feature (“25 Bucks”). Old does impress with production. He still wants the raw sound to be forefront, but his music does have a trap influence this time around. Lyrically, Danny is all about reacting to the fame. He’s struggled with handling money, attention, and the whole celebrity life, and it’s clearer than ever on Old. “Clean Up” talks about how he feels guilty for spending money on clothes, because he’s fall victim to consumerism. It’s a great perspective from someone who generally give a detailed description of his drug and sex life.

Danny doesn’t waste anytime here. All 19 songs are concise, and to the point. The features feel useful, with the exception of Charli XCX, who’s contribution could have been done by any female vocalist. I won’t lie, her name does give the song that extra push for the ‘wow’ factor. These tracks flow generally well, minus “25 Bucks”, which includes the unique Purity Ring sound. You can imagine how the sleek production contrasts a lot of the typical Danny Brown production. Old does show the influence of Danny Brown in the industry. Being able to have that all-star lineup of features goes to show how far he’s come since XXX.

The second half (“Side B [Dope Song]” onward) is all party based, trap songs that actually stand out very well. They’re very enjoyable, but I can only take so much of Danny’s crude yelps. Old closes very well with “Float On”, which like most of the album, discusses the hardships of growing up in Detroit’s Linwood area. From food-stamps to crack cocaine, he’s seen it all. The disturbing imagery feels very real on his lyrics. He’s an underrated lyricist who knows how to really engage the listener on an album. Old provides better diversity than XXX, and feels like it’s the next logical step in his hopeful and fast-growing career. He’s on top of his game so far, but I wonder how much potential he has before he hits a wall. Right now, it’s better to dwell on a very solid album that deserves the respect of many.

 

 

8.2

Oneohtrix Point Never – R Plus Seven

For the past three weeks, I’ve attempted to write this review about five times with the same events happening. First, I create a strong opening line that describes my feeling about the album, followed by a point that talks about the artist, but by the time I get around to actually describing why I feel that way about the music, I cannot discover the words I want to use. Claustrophobic? Spacey? Droning? Jagged? It just goes to show how professional and experienced I am at this. When I think I have it all together, I’m thrown a curve ball in the shape of R Plus Seven and my confidence is shot completely. Not to worry! This time I’ll finish my thought before I’m stolen the words.

Daniel Lopatin is a Brooklyn-based experimental musician, who goes by the name Oneohtrix Point Never when recording his.. music. Now Lopatin is renown in the music world for really pushing the boundaries, not by appropriateness, or by outrageous stunts, but by releasing just plain odd music that sells quite well for an indie artist. I can recall my first review ever being the 2011 album, Replica, and I wasn’t quite sure if I enjoyed it or not. I mean, I gave it a good review, but for a long time I wasn’t convinced that what I was listening was music. Now Lopatin isn’t the most experimental musician out there, but he definitely creates amazing patchworks with odd layouts.

R Plus Seven is Lopatin’s fourth record, and it utilizes a lot of plunderphonics from Replica, but with the unexpectedness of Returnal. What’s so interesting about R Plus Seven is how its Lopatin’s oddest album yet, but also the catchiest. Now catchy doesn’t go hand in hand with OPN, but hear me out. On the opening, “Boring Angel”, a rumbling organ note is held until, yes you read correctly, a steady click from the snare head. Another is how the climax of “Still Life” actually follows hook with synth-based riff of chords. “Zebra” also opens with a staccato of high pitched notes that continue to build and layer. I can run these examples for ages, but that’s the excitement behind this album. It catches you off guard even if you think you know what’s about to happen. Think Walter White’s mind in music.

I would say R Plus Seven is the perfect soundtrack for Breaking Bad’s final season. It has the eeriness of the dark and dreary moments, as well as the flourishing, somewhat happy(er?) scenes. I would never describe Lopatin’s music as happy, but it’s content, much like Vince Gilligan’s intention with his epic show. The way his music on this album shifts from quietly chugging along on a long, droning note and immediately jumps into a whole new sound is frightening. At points (“Along”), it can be hard to handle. I get so attached to the one repeating sound that I feel taken advantage of when Lopatin just dumps a great idea and moves on. It took many listens to realize that R Plus Seven has many dynamics and layers to it.

Now I completely understand when I get a comment that says, “This is hipster shit”. I get it. I don’t think I fully grasp what Lopatin’s intentions are with R Plus Seven. It’s uneasy, awkward, aggravated, at points pure noise, but what draws me back time and time again is the unique feeling of home and warmth from his nostalgic sounds. Lopatin understands himself better than we do, and we just have to deal with it. I feel that he doesn’t expect us, nor does he want us to think ‘I like your music because I know what its like’ because we don’t. We all have different experiences, and Lopatin is providing us the soundtrack to assist with them.

 

 

7.8

Super sexy video for FKA twigs-Papi Pacify

FKA-twigs-Papi-Pacify-video-608x407

As we grow as a human race  (I use that term very lightly), we are constantly redefining sex through music and with each generation, we seem to be getting closer to the heart of the matter. FKA twigs (affectionately named for the way her bones cracked?) is giving sexiness the much needed makeover it deserves (you fucking hear that Miley?). FKA twigs, hails from Gloucestershire, UK and is lending some soultryness to the already sexy genre of witchhouse, two step, pitch-down, trap music that groups such as Balam Acab, How to Dress Well , James Blake and Active Child , have made great careers at. Sounding a bit like Lykki Li or Kate Boy, FKA twigs is clearly carving an original path with Papi Pacify, the second release off her four track 2013 EP. One taste of this video will be all you need to get you there. Sex has a new face.

FKA twigs on Tumblr

Young Turks Record Label


Touché Amoré – Is Survived By

There’s a psychological effect associated with heavier genres of music. Hearing aggressive, violent, and even disturbing noises isn’t as appealing as associating other senses with the same handful of adjectives. While listening to Touché Amoré’s new album, Is Survived By, my computer crashed on three separate occasions as soon as I began the album. Now many would tell me just to buy a new computer, and I do agree, mine is shit, but a lot of listeners do this with hardcore or post-hardcore music. We don’t give it a chance, resulting in missing out in many great albums.

Touché Amoré is an LA post-hardcore band that is part of the self-proclaimed “The Wave”, which is a grouping  of 21st century bands in the genre. Along with La Dispute and Defeater, to name the popular few, they’ve been noted as a band that has brought back screamo and hardcore to large audience. Is Survived By is their third album, and it’s also their longest, which is something to note because their past releases don’t even hit 20 minutes. Is Surived By reaches an astonishing 29 minutes *GASP*, and the ride of melodic, post-hardcore doesn’t stop through the entire listen.

What caught my attention with the band early on is how on every release, they seem to experiment with many ideas throughout an album. Short blips of songs will smash through seconds of sound, and then that’s that. On this release, the band has taken a different approach. Although songs never exactly reach La Dispute lengths, they make an effort to add traditional song structure to a few tracks. “Social Caterpillar”, “Non Fiction”, and “Is Survived By” are the only three tracks to reach three minutes (how fitting). These serve as climaxes to the albums closer, but many of these blasts of tracks are actually many ideas separated into different tracks for the sake of packaging.

What makes Is Survived By so different compared to past releases is how the band jolts from song to song, but the flow of the album never strays. These tracks will pass, but only until the album hits stop do I realize that it’s finished. Jeremy Bolm’s screams are stronger than ever. The tension between every chord progression and drum hit is thick and heavy. The band creates such a claustrophobic atmosphere that it’s difficult to not try and break your way out. These songs aren’t just melodic, they stick with you. I found myself hitting repeat almost immediately as the album ended. After my many listens in one sitting, I would sit and digest what I just experienced. It’s the sound of a band at the top of their game.

Few bands can create exciting albums that slip under the radar to the public. Touché Amoré release solid albums time and time again, but they’ve yet to reach the pinnacle of potential. Is Survived By is another prime example of an amazing hardcore release that should be honored by every music buff on their blogs and websites. That’s exactly why I love writing these reviews.

 

8.8/10

The National are to appear on “Catching Fire” Soundtrack

A movie about killing children in an apocalyptic world can’t fit any better to The National’s gloomy lyrics. Maybe I’m taking the band’s lyrical meaning differently than what they intended to have, but it could work out. They’ve announced that the group wrote a song for the new Hunger Games movie, Catching Fire, which is set to hit theaters November 22nd. Titled “Lean”, lead vocalist Matt Berninger told NME that their original title was ‘too dark’ for the movie.

“The song almost didn’t make it because it was too dark for The Hunger Games soundtrack, which I thought was sort of funny because it’s about killing kids. I don’t know how a song can be darker than that. So we had to change the name of the song; I actually like the name ‘Lean.’… You know, I get it. It was a really fun project… It was a cool change from how we normally work on things, to write something for something else. It was kind of a pressure release thing, and it was fun.”

For the record, the original title was “Dying Is Easy”. Oddly enough, it doesn’t feel out of the ordinary for The National’s discography. Watch their video for “Graceless” below.

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